Bowel cancer

bowel cancer

What is bowel cancer (colon)?

Depending on where the cancer starts, bowel cancer is sometimes called colon or rectal cancer. Bowel cancer is one of the most common types of cancer diagnosed in the UK. Most people diagnosed with it are over the age of 60.

What are the symptoms of bowel cancer?

Bowel cancer is one of the most common types of cancer diagnosed in the UK. Most people diagnosed with it are over the age of 60. The 3 main symptoms of bowel cancer are: persistent blood in your poo – that happens for no obvious reason or is associated with a change in bowel habit

Where does bowel cancer start?

Bowel cancer starts in the large bowel (colon) or back passage (rectum). Where your bowel cancer starts will affect the treatment that you might have. For example, the treatment for colon cancer can be different to the treatment for rectal cancer. The colon is the first part of the large bowel. It is about 5 feet long and has 4 sections.

Can bowel cancer cause bowel obstruction?

Bowel obstruction. In some cases, bowel cancer can stop digestive waste passing through the bowel. This is known as a bowel obstruction. Symptoms of a bowel obstruction can include: A bowel obstruction is a medical emergency. If you suspect your bowel is obstructed, you should see your GP quickly.

What is colon cancer of the colon or rectum?

Cancer of the colon or rectum is sometimes called colorectal cancer, bowel cancer or cancer of the large intestine. It is one of the most common cancers in the UK. (In contrast, cancer of the small intestine is rare.) Bowel cancer can affect any part of the colon or rectum.

What is bowel cancer?

What is bowel cancer? Bowel cancer is cancer that starts in the large bowel (colon) or back passage (rectum). It is also known as colorectal cancer. Cancer is when abnormal cells start to divide and grow in an uncontrolled way. The cells can grow into surrounding tissues or organs, and may spread to other areas of the body. What is bowel cancer?

How is colorectal cancer related to the digestive system?

To understand colorectal cancer, it helps to understand the parts that make up the colon and rectum. The colon and rectum make up the large intestine (or large bowel), which is part of the digestive system, also called the gastrointestinal (GI) system (see illustration below).

What do you need to know about colorectal cancer?

To understand colorectal cancer, it helps to know about the normal structure and function of the colon and rectum. The colon and rectum make up the large intestine (or large bowel), which is part of the digestive system, also called the gastrointestinal (GI) system (see illustration below).

Where does bowel cancer pass through the body?

This passes through the bowel before leaving the body. The most common type of bowel cancer affects the large bowel, which includes the colon and the back passage. Large bowel cancer is also sometimes called colorectal cancer.

Can bowel cancer start in small intestine?

Preventing bowel cancer Bowel cancer is a general term for cancer that begins in the large bowel. Depending on where the cancer starts, bowel cancer is sometimes called colon or rectal cancer. Cancer can sometimes start in the small bowel (small intestine), but small bowel cancer is much rarer than large bowel cancer.

Where does rectal cancer start?

Rectal cancer. Rectal cancer starts in the last part of the large bowel (the back passage). This part of the bowel stores poo (stool) until it is ready to be passed out of the body. Rectal cancer is also called cancer of the rectum.

What is colon cancer and where does it start?

Most colon cancers start in the inner lining of the bowel and develop from small growths called polyps. The rectum links the colon to the anus. It is about 15cm (6 inches) long.

Sometimes, colon cancer can narrow the bowel, which stops stools (poo) from passing through. This is called a bowel obstruction. What is a blocked bowel (bowel obstruction)? What is a blocked bowel (bowel obstruction)? Sometimes, colon cancer can narrow the bowel, which stops poo (stools) from passing through.

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